Interesting math exercise

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djconklin
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Interesting math exercise

Postby djconklin » Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:39 pm

If you take a settler unit at the start of the game and it can only move one space and if you use a world that is 400 spaces wide, then for an "earth" like ours that is 60 miles per space and you would ONLY be moving at 20+ FEET per day, for 315 days a year, for each of the 50 years of the first turn!

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Caedo
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Re: Interesting math exercise

Postby Caedo » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:31 pm

Yeah, the calendar progression is a bit unrealistic. I mean, the amount of years per turn depends entirely on whether certain technologies have been discovered by any player in the world, so with one player researching that tech, all units on the map move faster, all cities produce stuff faster, all citizens consume food faster, all scientists research faster, all upkeep money is used up faster etc. But really, there isn't any way for the timeline slowdown to make sense except when an asteroid hits earth to speed up or slow down its movement around the sun, so in a regular scenario, turn lengths would have to stay the same all the time, which would then require modern era version of settlers etc., because it wouldn't make sense for settlers to be as slow today as they were in the stone age.

louis94
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Re: Interesting math exercise

Postby louis94 » Tue Dec 22, 2015 10:35 pm

Yup, and world population is zero in 4,000 BC. And I couldn't ever get 350 M inhabitants in the Europe scenario. And travelling to Alpha Centauri is centuries ahead from now.

djconklin
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Re: Interesting math exercise

Postby djconklin » Wed Dec 23, 2015 9:08 am

Caedo wrote:Yeah, the calendar progression is a bit unrealistic. I mean, the amount of years per turn depends entirely on whether certain technologies have been discovered by any player in the world, so with one player researching that tech, all units on the map move faster, all cities produce stuff faster, all citizens consume food faster, all scientists research faster, all upkeep money is used up faster etc. But really, there isn't any way for the timeline slowdown to make sense except when an asteroid hits earth to speed up or slow down its movement around the sun, so in a regular scenario, turn lengths would have to stay the same all the time, which would then require modern era version of settlers etc., because it wouldn't make sense for settlers to be as slow today as they were in the stone age.
Interesting, but I was more interested in the movement rate of the unit.

djconklin
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Re: Interesting math exercise

Postby djconklin » Wed Dec 23, 2015 9:08 am

louis94 wrote:Yup, and world population is zero in 4,000 BC. And I couldn't ever get 350 M inhabitants in the Europe scenario.
Try cutting the amount of food needed to get the next unit of population.